Hitler Hotel

src="http://www.gadling.com/media/2006/02/Hitler.jpg" width="150" align="right" vspace="4" border="1" />Adolph
Hitler slept here.

And now, so can you.

Brave investors have decided that the lovely area of href="http://www.berchtesgaden.com/e/e_index.htm">Berchtesgaden, Germany would be a wonderful place for an href="http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/6c/1/en/hd/zceha">InterContinental hotel.  And they are right, for the
most part.  There are a fantastic array of lakes and mountains and beautiful scenery throughout the area. 
The only problem was that Adolph Hitler thought so as well.  He made Berchtesgaden his second home, as did much of
his senior staff.  In fact, the area became a type of summer national headquarters for the Third Reich, as well as
one of the locations Hitler penned Mein Kampf

Much of it was destroyed towards the end of World War II, but as recent as ten years ago I was able to tramp
through the woods and climb amongst the ruins and within the tunnels left behind.  Apparently, much of this has
been cleared out in recent years as the area tries to return to its glory days as a 19th century mountain resort. 
The building of the “Hitler
Hotel,”
as many are now calling it, is just one step in the healing process (albeit the wrong step
according to The Simon Wiesenthal Center who has strongly
criticized
the decision, arguing that Berchtesgaden “was the seat of evil, where Adolf Hitler, Hermann
Goering, Joseph Goebbels and the Nazi leadership took most of the decisions that cost the world 70 million
lives”).

Nonetheless, part of the approval to allow the hotel to be built was the requirement that it was to be an upscale
hotel and thus, out of the price range of neo-Nazis hoping to bed down in the fuehrer’s favorite nap place. 
At 250-700 euros a night, I probably won’t be sleeping there either.