Newest Space Tourism Venture To Dangle Travelers From A Helium Balloon

Helium Balloon Space Tourism Flight
Photo: World View Enterprises, Inc

Another day, another space tourism venture announced-but this one caught our attention for being a little different from most. Rather than shooting travelers up in rockets, an American company says it’s planning to dangle space tourists in a capsule attached to a helium balloon.

World View Enterprises will use a helium balloon to slowly lift travelers up to the edge of space as they sit in a luxurious space capsule. After the ride is over, the capsule will detach from the helium balloon and float back down to Earth with the aid of a parachute. While that all sounds a little precarious, the company says balloons like this have been sent into space for decades and the whole process is actually quite low-risk.The helium balloon rides will take travelers up about 20 miles into the sky. Although that’s not technically space, which is around 60 miles up, travelers will still be in for a nice view that includes being able to see the curvature of the earth.

And if space travel has mostly sounded like the domain of the super rich so far, the good news is that the balloon space trip will be somewhat more affordable than the other options that have been proposed. A two-hour journey will set you back about $75,000, which is a fair deal cheaper than Virgin Galactic’s space flights that cost a quarter of a million dollars. Tickets for the World View space flights are expected to go on sale in a few months.

Volunteer For Space Travel Study

space travel
Sweetie187/Flickr

Like the idea of space travel but you’re not a NASA astronaut? The University of Hawaii is looking for volunteers age 18-65 to take part in a new series of space exploration studies. Odds are you won’t exactly be in space, but the studies hope to provide information that is essential for long-duration space exploration missions, like human travel to Mars. To do that, they need some humans. You might do just fine.

“The upcoming missions are focused on evaluating the social, interpersonal and cognitive factors that affect team performance over time,” says the University of Hawaii in a news release. To do that, volunteers will bring with them some research project or scholarly work they have in progress to work on in a group setting. That work might include engineering design and technology evaluation, scholarly writing, or artistic endeavors.While they don’t need to be NASA astronauts, participants in the study must meet the basic requirements of the NASA astronaut program. Candidates must be tobacco-free, able to pass a Class 2 flight physical examination, and understand, speak and write fluently in English.

The opportunity is part of the University of Hawaii’s Hi-Seas project that is simulating long-duration Mars missions here on Earth, detailed in this video:

Over 100,000 People Want a 1-Way Ticket to Mars

Thousands Have Applied for a One-Way Ticket to Mars
Australia may have tempted you with the best job in the world, but a new competition is taking social to outer space, giving people the chance to colonize another planet: Mars. Wannabe space travelers are submitting videos to apply for one of 40 spots on the one-way mission, scheduled to launch in 2022.

If you’re wondering what sort of people sign up for a one-way ticket to another planet, check out some of the videos here.

Planetary Defense, Future Of Space Travel Could Hinge On Kickstarter

Planetary
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Planetary Resources, the group of world leaders charged with building the ground floor opportunities for a space travel industry, needs our help. One of those opportunities involves mining asteroids, believed to hold riches beyond belief. Developing technology that will enable travel to those pots of gold is already a daunting task, but the real concern is finding those asteroids in the first place. Luckily, Planetary Resources has a plan.

This week, Planetary Resources announced plans to empower citizen scientists to aid in the search for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) and support planetary defense. Funded by the ARKYD Kickstarter (if it reaches $1.7 million by Sunday, and you can help make that happen), Planetary Resources will partner with Zooniverse to create Asteroid Zoo, a program to find potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) at home.Asteroid Zoo will allow students, citizen scientists and space enthusiasts to search through terabytes of data collected by Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) for undiscovered asteroids in a fun, game-like process from their personal computers, and help train computers to better find them in the future.

Sound interesting? Want to have a hand in forging the future of space travel for all? Check out this video from Planetary Resources with Chief Asteroid Miner Chris Lewicki:

PayPal Galactic Makes Buying Stuff On Your Space Trip Easy

PayPal Galactic
paz.ca/Flickr

So you’re on your way to Mars and forgot to pay a bill back on Earth. Before today, there would really be no way to do that, what with interplanetary currency still undefined. No problem. Now, on its 15th anniversary, PayPal announced the launch of PayPal Galactic and there is indeed a way to make universal space payments.

“Trips to Mars, the moon, even orbit will require we provide astronauts and astro-tourists with as many comforts from home as possible, including how to pay each other,” said astronaut/author Buzz Aldrin in an announcement made with PayPal President David Marcus reported by Laboratory Equipment.

PayPal Galactic addresses concerns of the SETI Institute and Space Tourism Society about how to prepare and support the future of space commerce. Working with PayPal, leaders in the space industry will address real life questions ranging from what currency will look like in a cash-free interplanetary society to the evolution of risk and fraud management.

“Whether it’s paying a bill, even helping a family member on Earth, we’ll need access to money. I think humans will reach Mars, and I would like to see it happen in my lifetime,” said Aldrin.Right now the need for PayPal Galactic exists, with astronauts manning the International Space Station year-round. “Within five to 10 years the earliest types of ‘space hotels’ and orbital and lunar commerce will be operational and in need of a payment system,” said John Spencer, founder and president of the Space Tourism Society.

Yet another good reason why space travel will happen in your lifetime; Buzz Aldrin, 83, is banking on it.