Photo Of The Day: Summer Afternoon

As the leaves turn to orange, then red, then brown, before disappearing entirely, memories of lazy summer days tend to slip further and further away. Today’s Photo of the Day, taken by Flickr user Trish Hartmann in Plön, Germany, captures the essence of late summer perfectly. The foliage is bright green, and the water reflects the sunlight. You’ll want to keep this shot on file for the depths of winter.

Do you have any photos that evoke summer and warmth? Upload your shots to the Gadling Flickr Pool and your image could be selected as our Photo of the Day.

Photo of the Day: giant otter

Flickr user Max Waugh Photography was on a nature excursion in the Peruvian Amazon when he came upon this unique species of giant otter, popping its head above the glassy water surface. I love the photo’s close up details – the animal’s elongated neck, wiry whiskers and curious stare. With great nature shots like this one, it’s particularly important to get as close (as is safe) or zoomed in to your subject as possible.

Have any great travel photos from your recent journeys? Why not add them to our Gadling group on Flickr? We might just pick one of yours as our Photo of the Day.

1100-year old canoe unearthed in Florida

An 1100-year old canoe being excavated in Florida last week.An ancient canoe, estimated to be more than 1100 years old, was excavated by a team of archaeologists on Weedon Island, just off the coast of Florida, last week. The artifact is believed to have been built by the Manasota tribe that once inhabited the region but mysteriously disappeared around the 8th or 9th century.

The 40-foot canoe was actually discovered by amateur archaeologist Harry Koran more than a decade ago. Koran was combing the beach, looking for other artifacts, when he spotted the boat buried in the mud. He couldn’t tell exactly what it was when he first found the canoe, but the precise lines told him that it was man-made and more than just a branch in the soil. It turned out to be an artifact from a tribe that little is known about.

The team of archaeologists who excavated the craft worked carefully, but diligently, to remove the canoe from the mud. They cut the wooden hull into sections, and loaded it onto another boat for transport back to the mainland. Once there, they washed off centuries of muck and lowered the sections into clean, fresh water to prepare it for the preservation process ahead, a process that could take up to two years to complete. Once it has been painstakingly restored, the canoe will eventually go on display at Weedon Island Preserve Cultural and Natural History Center.

The Manasota tribe were believed to have lived in the southern Florida region for hundreds of years, dating back to the 5th century BC. They were one of the first tribes to build permanent residences in the area, and they apparently thrived there until the 9th century, when they disappeared, leaving little indication of what happened to them. Most historians believe that they were absorbed by other tribes that migrated to the Florida peninsula, but their actual fate remains a mystery.

[Photo credit: WTSP News]


GadlingTV’s Travel Talk – Thailand Part 7: Sangkhlaburi


Gadling TV’s Travel Talk, episode 37 – Click above to watch video after the jump

No matter what type of adventure you’re looking for, Thailand has it all.

In the first half of Travel Talk’s grand Thai expedition, we’ve tamed elephants, explored Bangkok’s temples, eaten scorpions, taken in a Muay Thai match, and witnessed a train running directly through a bustling market. Now, we’re taking you to explore a lesser known province of Thailand for a closer look at the culture and traditions of rural Thai life.

Situated near the border of Myanmar, Sangkhlaburi is a great destination for those looking for alternative to Chiang Mai or the beaches of Koh Samui. After embarking on an ox cart ride and being welcomed with a traditional ceremony in a Hmong village, we try stay upright on a canoe in Sangklahburi’s lake and discover that it’s not always easy to avoid the dreaded hoards of tour buses.

If you have any questions or comments about Travel Talk, you can email us at talk AT gadling DOT com.


Subscribe via iTunes:
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Hosts: Stephen Greenwood & Aaron Murphy-Crews
Produced, Edited, and Directed by: Stephen Greenwood & Aaron Murphy-Crews
Special thanks: Tourism Authority of Thailand, Trikaya Tours

Travel Talk took Thailand by storm on invitation from the Tourism Authority of Thailand. No editorial content was guaranteed and Aaron & Stephen were free to openly share all adventures that they embarked upon.

Woman begins canoe trip from Seattle to San Diego

Margo Pellagrino describes herself as “a stay-at-home mom who doesn’t do a very good job at staying home.” That seems an apt description considering she has just set off on a epic canoe trip that will see her paddling from Seattle to San Diego over the next couple of months, while raising awareness about the health of the world’s oceans.

Margo started her journey on July 3rd, and over the past few days she has paddled across Puget Sound, down the Juan De Fuca Strait, and out into the Pacific Ocean. From there, she’ll turn south, with the intention of paddling her outrigger canoe all the way to San Diego, a distance of more than 2500 miles. Along the way, she’ll make planned stops in a number of cities and towns, where she hopes to spread the word about the importance of the oceans to the overall health of the planet, and how we can all do small things on a day-to-day basis that will help protect them.

This isn’t the first long distance paddle for Margo. Back in 2007 she made the journey from Miami, Florida to Camden, Maine, a distance of over 2000 miles, by canoe. She followed up that adventure in 2008 with another journey, this time along the Gulf Coast, going from Miami to New Orleans. Those trips helped to reinforce her love of the oceans, and her desire to help raise awareness about how their health can effect the rest of the planet.

You can follow Margo’s progress by reading her latest entries to her blog and tracking her via GPS. She’ll be making regular updates along the way, sharing her adventure, and message, with the rest of us.

[Photo credit: Margo Pellagrino]