Survey Ranks ‘World’s Most Unfriendliest’ Countries

Have you ever been to a country that just seems to give tourists the cold shoulder? Now, there are some figures behind those unwelcome feelings; the World Economic Forum has put together a report that ranks countries based on how friendly they are to tourists.

The extensive analyses ranks 140 countries according to attractiveness and competitiveness in the travel and tourism industries. But one category, “attitude of population toward foreign visitors,” stands out.

According the data, Bolivia (pictured above) ranked as the most unfriendly country, scoring a 4.1 out of seven on a scale of “very unwelcome” (0) to “very welcome” (7).

Next on the list were Venezuela and the Russian Federation, followed by Kuwait, Latvia and Iran (perhaps when visiting one of these countries, you should try your best to not look like a tourist?).

On the opposite side of the scale were Iceland, New Zealand and Morocco, which were ranked the world’s most welcoming nations for visitors.

Tourism infrastructure, business travel appeal, sustainable development of natural resources and cultural resources were some of the key factors in the rankings. Data was compiled from an opinion survey, as well as hard data from private sources and national and international agencies and organizations such as the World Bank/International Finance Corporation and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), among others.

The report also emphasized the need for continued development in the travel and tourism sector, pointing out that the industry currently accounts for one in 11 jobs worldwide.

All of the results of the survey can be found after the jump.

Attitude of population toward foreign visitors
(1 = very unwelcome; 7 = very welcome)

Friendliest

1. Iceland 6.8
2. New Zealand 6.8
3. Morocco 6.7
4. Macedonia, FYR 6.7
5. Austria 6.7
6. Senegal 6.7
7. Portugal 6.6
8. Bosnia and Herzegovina 6.6
9. Ireland 6.6
10. Burkina Faso 6.6

Unfriendliest

1. Bolivia 4.1
2. Venezuela 4.5
3. Russian Federation 5.0
4. Kuwait 5.2
5. Latvia 5.2
6. Iran 5.2
7. Pakistan 5.3
8. Slovak Republic 5.5
9. Bulgaria 5.5
10. Mongolia 5.5

Have you ever visited somewhere where they didn’t exactly roll out the welcome mat? Alternatively, have you visited somewhere on the “unfriendly” list and had a great, welcoming experience? Let us know how your travel experiences compare with the survey’s ranking in the comments below.

[via CNN]

[Photo credit: Phil Whitehouse, Wikimedia Commons]

Photo Of The Day: Mongolian Ger

photo of the day

This Photo of the Day, titled “Mongolian Ger,” comes from Gadling Flickr pool member Mark Fischer who captured the image with a Nikon D90.

Mark describes the photo as “A ger, sometimes called a yurt, sits on the Steppes near Mandalgovi, Mongolia.”

A ger or yert is a portable, bent wood-framed dwelling structure traditionally used by nomads in the Mongolian-Manchurian Steppes, which covers an area of 887,300 square kilometers. Mandalgovi is the capital of the Dundgovi Province of Mongolia on the border of the Gobi Desert.

Upload your best shots to the Gadling Group Pool on Flickr. Several times a week we choose our favorite images from the pool as a Photo of the Day.

[Photo Credit- Flickr user Mark Fischer]

China Airshow To Feature Acrobatic Team

china airshow

Airshow China 2012 is scheduled to run from November 13 to 18 and will feature over 600 exhibitors from 39 countries. Promising to be bigger and better this year, the show hopes to become more recognized by the international aviation and aerospace community. To help make that happen, the show will feature a variety of airborne daredevil fliers.

Officially titled the China International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition, Airshow China is the only international aerospace trade show in China that is endorsed by the Chinese government. That’s significant because China is looking for 5,400 new passenger aircraft between now to 2031. To get that many aircraft, China wants to make its own plane, the C919, which has attracted international aviation manufacturers to the show.

“We had to close for entries last month as we did not have any space for more,” said Yang Xiangang, vice general manager of Zhuhai Airshow in a South China Morning Post report.Airshow China, held in Zhuhai, features a display of aviation products, hosted trade talks, a technological exchange and a flying display of acrobatic teams from Europe.

This year, the Breitling Jet Team, Breitling Wingwalkers and Yves “Jetman” Rossy are scheduled to participate.

To get to China, they will fly through Eastern Europe, into Russia passing through Siberia, then on to Mongolia and down through China to reach their destination as we see in this video.




[Photo Credit: Flickr user doniphon]

Photo Of The Day: Mongolia

mongolia

Mongolia looks like the perfect place for a road trip. This image, according to its photographer Mark Fischer, was snapped between the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar and Mandalgovi, a small town perched on the edge of the Gobi Desert. The bright yellow of the broken-down car, the blue sky, the ramshackle buildings, the green earth, the machinery dumped here and there – little of it suggests tourist board boilerplate, granted, but every last detail speaks to Mongolia’s compelling geographies and vast distances.

Upload your best images to the Gadling Group Pool on Flickr. We choose our favorites from the pool to be Photos of the Day.

Video Of The Day: Traveler Lets People Leave Mark On His Shoes


“I’ve been to some beautiful places and done some awesome things, but the best part has been meeting all kinds of amazing people,” said the filmmaker of the above video. He had learned the valuable lesson while living in Asia for three years, but when he took a six-month trip through the Philippines, China and Mongolia he decided he’d like to visually demonstrate how the people he met left their mark on him. Using markers, he let people draw on his shoes, which took him through desert landscapes and cascading waterfalls. Watch above to see him walk through sand, snow, mud and more.

Has anyone – a helpful local, another traveler or even a stranger – ever left their mark on you while traveling? Whether literally or figuratively, feel free to share your stories below.