First Same-Sex Marriage in New Zealand Takes Place on a Flight


New Zealand recently legalized same-sex marriage and in celebration, Air New Zealand launched a contest that would grant a couple a sky-high wedding ceremony aboard one of their flights. This video documents the wedding of the two women who won the contest, making theirs the first same-sex marriage in New Zealand.

This isn’t the first mile-high marriage; it isn’t even the first in-flight same-sex marriage. In 2010, a captain diverted a flight into Canadian airspace so a same-sex couple on board could wed. Two same-sex marriage ceremonies took place on a SAS flight in 2010. And in 2008, a couple was married while on top of a plane.

But weddings aren’t the only out of place events that occur in air. A woman recently began to give birth on a plane. Coincidentally, something somewhat similar happened to a friend of mine who went into labor during her layover at LAX. I guess you never know when you’ll get a little extra in-flight entertainment.A Flight Attendant Helps Deliver a Baby During a Flight

Video: New Zealand Time-Lapse

Flights to New Zealand from the USA are expensive. Thankfully, I have expertly created time-lapses to hold me over until I can get myself out to the seemingly mythical and definitely awe-inspiring country. This time-lapse by Bevan Percival is gorgeous. The images in the film were shot during 2012 over the course of two months spent in the North Island of New Zealand. Rushing fog over steep and lush hillsides is met with startling views of jagged mountains against nearly barren expanses of desert. Scenes like these make this video the beautiful work of art it is. Enjoy.

[Thanks, Laughing Squid]

New Zealand Approves Same-Sex Marriage

Video: The Stunning Landscapes Of New Zealand In Timelapse

Considered one of the great adventure travel destinations on Earth, New Zealand is a country known for its stunning landscapes and breathtaking vistas. Nowhere is that more evident than in the video below, which simply put is 5+ minutes of jaw-dropping imagery. Shot entirely on the North Island, the video offers enticing shots of snow-capped mountains, beautiful shorelines and verdant forests.

Warning: the contents of this video may inspire you to board a plane to New Zealand. Gadling is not responsible for the sudden onset of terminal wanderlust (although we do wholeheartedly support it!).


Video Of The Day: Bear Grylls Safety Video (Behind The Scenes)

Air New Zealand doesn’t let you down with videos; that’s for sure. This video, “Behind the Scenes of the Bear Essentials,” starring Bear Grylls, is just that: a behind the scenes video from “The Bear Essentials of Safety” video, which saw over two million views. Focusing on the outdoors goodness New Zealand has to offer travelers (instead of just, say, the plane itself), this video is a few things all at once: hilarious, informative and inspiring. The dramatic landscape is offset by the gritty tactics of Bear Grylls. So take a minute, watch this video, enjoy a laugh, and then join me in the endless brainstorming on when to finally visit New Zealand.

Bear Grylls Stars in Air New Zealand Safety Video

Passing Gas Mid-Flight Is Good For Your Health, Doctors Find

airplane seatsA new study from a group of New Zealand physicians has confirmed something we’re rather certain most people would rather not know: it’s not only OK, but preferred, that passengers pass gas mid-flight.

Breaking wind has health benefits, the study finds, and the benefits of breaking wind mid-air outweigh the health effects of holding it in.

Anecdotal evidence in the survey, originally reported on by the Associated Foreign Press and reprinted on News 24, shows that flying increases one’s likelihood of passing gas (a natural phenomenon that already happens, on average, ten times per day).

The study was led by Danish gastroenterologist Jacob Rosenberg, who published a 3,000-word article in the New Zealand Medical Journal last week.

“(Holding back) holds significant drawbacks for the individual, such as discomfort and even pain, bloating, dyspepsia (indigestion), pyrosis (heartburn) just to name but a few resulting abdominal symptoms,” the study found. “Moreover, problems resulting from the required concentration to maintain such control may even result in subsequent stress symptoms.”

When should you not pass gas? When you’re part of the cockpit crew, the study finds.

“On the one hand, if the pilot restrains a fart, all the drawbacks previously mentioned, including impaired concentration, may affect his abilities to control the plane,” the researchers said. “On the other hand, if he lets go of the fart, his co-pilot may be affected by its odour, which again reduces safety onboard the flight.”

We’re only quoting the article here, folks.

One positive? Textile seats used in coach are more likely to “absorb” odors produced than leather seats in most first and business class cabins.

“We humbly propose that active charcoal should be embedded in the seat cushion, since this material is able to neutralise the odour,” the study found.

We’re pretty certain that, as passengers, we’d like you to hold in your gassy in-flight moments, regardless of health concerns. What do you think?

[Image Credit: sbamueller]