Traveling Couple Hits 20 Countries In 312 Days On 3 Minutes Of Video




In a quest to tackle 30 must-have travel experiences before they turn 30, career breakers Gerard & Kieu of GQ trippin traveled 108,371 kilometers (67,338 miles) in 312 days through 20 countries for one adventure of a lifetime.

Shooting 1,266 videos along the way, the traveling couple ended up with 11 hours of video but has reduced it and their entire year of travel to just three minutes as we see in this video.

While traveling, the couple simply gathered video, saving countless hours of editing and production for later.

“We never claim to be vloggers, which is probably why you hardly saw any videos from our travels last year,” says Gerard & Kieu on their GQ trippin website, charged with a simple mantra: See Eat Trip. “Most are short clips of random things that don’t really make sense on their own, so we didn’t bother sharing.”

A year of travel also means a lot of meals, some not so good, prompting the couple to post their Worst In Food this week.

New Expedia App Lets You Create and Share Vacation Video




A new Facebook App developed by Expedia is letting travelers share more than just images of their vacation. Thanks to HTML5 technology, fans can now share moving video with dubbed narrative in the “Find Your Story” application.

Much like a mini movie, travelers can integrate their vacation photos with voice over and Google Maps technology to share a much more personalized experience. The app is just a portion of a larger brand campaign called “Find Yours,” which the brand claims will showcase the “personal nature of travel.” Cool, but what we’re really into is the video.

To use the technology, users can go directly to FindYours.com and the app will prompt travelers with a few questions about their trip: where the journey began, where it ended, and up to five locations visited along the way. Google’s technology will insert destination specific graphics into the video. The app will then ask users to name their story, upload up to 10 images from your Facebook and Instagram albums and then choose a filter and music. Once the story is complete, users can share via Facebook, Twitter and provide a unique URL to friends and family.

Sound cool? We think it is. Then again, we’re not sure that our Facebook “friends” actually care that much about our vacations. It might go over about as well as those people who send really long holiday letters to friends and family. What do you think?

Video: A Sublime Disruption

A Sublime Disruption” from Gareth Nolan on Vimeo.

Gareth Nolan shot this short film, “A Sublime Disruption,” during a trip around the world he took in 2011. “This video is not about the places I visited, but merely an attempt to evoke the feeling of wonder and excitement in seeing as much as I was lucky to,” Nolan says on his Vimeo page. Indeed, this video captures the wonder of travel well. With footage from Belize, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cook Islands, Chile, China, French Polynesia, Guatemala, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Peru, Russia, Tibet and The United States, from what I can tell, Nolan spent the year 2011 well.

3 Mistakes to Avoid on Round the World Trips

Video: Cities Across The Globe

CITY #3721 from Lam Ho Tak on Vimeo.

You can board a plane and fly to any city on this planet. No matter where you go, you’ll find familiarity amid the unfamiliarity. Paved and braided highway systems weave through cities and carry pairs of headlights through the dark night, one after another. Pedestrians congregate on street corners and wait for the opportunity to cross and then do so together as a herd. The buildings get taller; the cars get smaller; the chaos appears to increase, but within it there is a machine that is moving through its commands and that machine knows no barriers. In this video made by Lam Ho Tak, a student at the University of Hong Kong, that machine is documented at work in cities across the globe. Already the winner of several awards, this video is an entertaining short mix and matching color tones, subdued lighting, motion, and other elements of city life that act as a common denominator for cities everywhere.

Visit New York City

No Frills Airline: 1970s Sitcom Predicts The Future Of Air Travel



Do you think economy class passengers deserve better treatment? Apparently, they also did in the 1970s. This 10 minute clip from the Carol Burnett Show pokes fun at the differences between the ambiance of business class/first class and economy, also known as the “No Frills Section.” While outlandish – hopefully you’ve never been kicked by a stewardess for putting your feet on the floor, had to use a rope as a seat belt or been forced to exit the plane midair – it does have some relevance. And, as Boarding Area points out, the show even anticipated all the extra charges fliers incur. While the video is a little long, it’s definitely worth a look for a good laugh.