Kelburn Castle To Lose Psychedelic Art, Going Old School

Kelburn Castle
Kelburn Castle isn’t your typical 13th century Scottish castle and aristocratic estate. It’s an example of some of the best street art in the world.

As you can see, it’s pretty trippy, the product of a group of Brazilian street artists in 2007. It was allowed by the local council on the understanding that it would be up for no more than three years. Generally, there are strict rules in the UK about changing the appearance of historic buildings.

Despite this, the castle’s owner, the Earl of Glasgow, has been fighting to keep it. Now it looks like the mural will have to go. It turns out the layer of cement that the mural is painted on is damaging the original medieval walls.

Being a modern sort of aristocrat, the Earl of Glasgow has launched a Facebook page to save the mural. So far it’s attracted more than 4,000 likes.

[Photo courtesy Iain and Sarah]

%Poll-75981%

Art Institute Of Chicago Opens Roy Lichtenstein Exhibition

Art Institute of Chicago, Roy LichtensteinThe Art Institute of Chicago has one great exhibition after another and is definitely on Gadling’s top ten list of things to see in the Windy City. Now they’ve opened the largest exhibition of Roy Lichtenstein’s artwork ever to be shown.

Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective includes more than 160 works from all phases of the famous Pop artist’s career, from his early comic book imitations through his experiments with Surrealism to his later nudes and Chinese landscapes.

Although Lichtenstein died in 1997, his work is immediately recognizable and collectable today. This exhibition shows how truly diverse he was as a creator. While the comic strips will undoubtedly get the most attention as they always do, visitors will have a chance to see what else this influential artist got up to.

“Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective” runs from May 22-September 3.

[Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons]

Stonehenge Replicas Pop Up Everywhere!

Stonehenge replicas, Snowhenge
Is this Stonehenge? No, it’s Snowhenge! It’s a 1/3-scale replica built at the MacKay Jaycees Family Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan. While it certainly wasn’t as hard to build as the original megalithic stone circle in England, it still involved working 1000 cubic feet of packed snow to make a circle more than six feet tall and thirty feet in diameter. The builders did such an accurate job that they preserved the original monument’s astronomical alignments.

Stonehenge is endlessly fascinating and has inspired people all over the world to create replicas. The most realistic looking is Foamhenge at Natural Bridge, Virginia. The “stones” are made out of painted styrofoam that have been sculpted in the exact shapes of the real Stonehenge.

There’s also the Maryhill Stonehenge, a full-sized concrete recreation of what Stonehenge used to look like in its heyday rather than the ruins we have now. Located in Maryhill, Washington, it was built as a monument to the dead of World War I. In Rolla, Missouri, students at the Missouri University of Science and Technology used water jets to sculpt a Stonehenge out of some 160 tons of granite. It was named one of the year’s Ten Outstanding Engineering Achievements by the National Society of Professional Engineers in 1985. Then there’s Carhenge, near Alliance, Nebraska, which is made out of, well. . .you know.

%Gallery-153665%Americans aren’t the only people making new Stonehenges. Despite having the original, the British have built numerous replicas. Even as far back as the early 19th century, gentlemen with too much money and not enough to do were building Stonehenges on their country estates. Contemporary British Artist Jeremy Deller has put a modern twist on an old tradition with his inflatable bouncy Stonehenge in honor of the 2012 Olympics. And then there’s Stonehenge Aotearoa in New Zealand, which has similar astronomical alignments to Stonehenge (solstices, equinoxes, etc.) but aligned for the Southern hemisphere.

For all the latest on Stonehenge replicas, check out Clonehenge, a blog dedicated to them. They have info about Citrus-henge, Woolhenge, and my personal favorite: Spamhenge! If you make your own replica, send them a photo and they’ll post it online with a rating of one to ten druids. And yes, they know the druids didn’t build Stonehenge.

This isn’t just a quirky blog, but a serious research project. Well, maybe not serious, but pretty meticulous in any case. They’ve documented 72 large permanent Stonehenge replicas from all over the world in addition to the ones made with cake, jelly, glass and medicine bottles.

[Photo courtesy MichiganArchaeologist]

London’s Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art opens Alberto Burri retrospective

LondonThe Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art is one of London’s best small art museums. Housed in an elegant Georgian mansion on a quiet street in the London borough of Islington, it has the best collection of modern Italian art in the city and perhaps the nation.

Its latest exhibition is Alberto Burri: Form and Matter, a retrospective of one of the leading Italian figures in modern art. Burri (1915-1995) started painting while interned in Texas as a prisoner of war during WWII. By the 1950s he was experimenting with common materials such as sacking, plastic, and tar, breaking out of the two-dimensions dictated by traditional painting.

His effect on modern art was huge and spawned many imitators. This exhibition brings together works from a number of museums and rarely seen examples from private collections. Aficionados of modern art won’t want to miss this one.

Alberto Burri: Form and Matter runs until April 7.

Photo courtesy Alex Sarteanesi.

Art and film in Rotterdam, Netherlands

art rotterdam This winter, art and film take over Rotterdam in the Netherlands with two events you will not want to miss. Watch films by independent filmmakers, listen to enlightening debates, take in modern art, and drink up at fun after parties.

International Film Festival Rotterdam
January 25-February 5, 2012

The 41st International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFFR) will be offering twelve days of films, exhibitions, debates, and parties. Along with showcasing talented and enjoyable works, IFFR also aims to help support independent filmmaking from around the world as well discover new talent. Interested in submitting a film? Click here. To learn more about attending and buying tickets, click here.

Art Rotterdam
February 9-12, 2012

Art Rotterdam is an international art fair for contemporary modern art. This lively event holds high standards for their artists, and the attendance of many of the top art galleries in the world has ensured its success. Attend events, peruse exhibits, and attend after parties. To learn more about tickets and events, click here.