Catching the Northern Lights

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Winter is just about over and with its passing, so too will disappear the Northern Lights. 

I’ve never actually seen the aurora borealis, but from what I hear, the sky lights up with shimmery
iridescence that’s absolutely breathtaking. 

The result of electrical discharge in the upper atmosphere,
the Northern Lights can only be seen, as you might suspect, in the North.  The upper reaches of Scandinavia and
Alaska offer some of the best viewing opportunities.  Interested in checking it out yourself but intimidated by
the phrase Arctic Circle?  A recent article in Budget Travel tackles the href="http://www.budgettravelonline.com/bt-dyn/content/article/2006/02/07/AR2006020700987.html">logistics of venturing
so far north for this event.  It’s easier than you might expect.

But be warned, Northern Light sightings are a hit-or-miss endeavor that depend upon fickle atmospheric conditions
and an absent cloud cover.  The good news is that if you miss this amazing display of nature’s fireworks,
you can always go back next year.  Unlike a solar eclipse, this is one of nature’s annual events.