Photo Of The Day: Parc Güell In Barcelona

Parc Güell is one of artist Antoni Gaudí‘s masterpieces: a 17-hectare garden complex with whimsical architectural elements overlooking the city of Barcelona. One of the park’s many highlights is the preponderance of Gaudí’s famous tiled mosaics, one of which is captured in all of its multicolored glory in today’s Photo of the Day from Flickr user Gus NYC.Do you have any great travel photos? You now have two options to enter your snapshots into the running for Gadling’s Photo of the Day. Upload your shots to the Gadling Flickr Pool, or mention @GadlingTravel and use hashtag #gadling in the caption or comments for your post on Instagram. Don’t forget to give us a follow too!

[Photo Credit: Flickr user Gus NYC]

Photo Of The Day: Concrete Jungle

barcelona street art

When you’re traveling, art can pop up to surprise you in the most random of places. This elaborate piece of rooftop graffiti was captured by Flickr user Aviv from the heights of Parc Guell in Barcelona, Spain. Judging by the comments on Flickr, this street artist might just give Gaudi a run for his money.

Does your image of surprising street art belong here? Upload your favorite shots to the Gadling Group Pool and your image could be selected as our Photo of the Day.

5 things to do in Barcelona, Spain: from Sagrada Familia to Barceloneta Beach

Barcelona

It may not be the capital of Spain, but Barcelona is most certainly the capital of Catalonia, and it’s one of the more bustling, thriving and varied cities that Europe has to offer. You might say it’s equipped with the perfect mix of old and new, and given its proximity to the Mediterranean Sea, it also boasts something that most other major cities do not: a beach! Of course, figuring out things to do in this town isn’t quite as easy as deciding to come here, so we’re here to help. Read on for five incredible things to see and do while in Barcy, be it for business or pleasure.
%Gallery-117263%A visit to Sagrada Familia, Barcelona’s most famous church

Barcelona

Köln has The Dom, Paris has the Notre Dame Cathedral, and Barcelona has Sagrada Familia. Architected by the famed Antoni Gaudí, this massive Catholic place of worship doubles as a massive place of crowd gathering. It’s one of the more popular tourist stops in the city, and it’s well-positioned for finding other things to do within walking distance. Ground was broke on this church in 1882, and it’s still not done. Estimates say that it’ll be completed within the next two decades, but locals seem to have their doubts. Despite the cranes and construction, it’s still a sight to behold. You don’t have to go inside to appreciate it, but €12.50 (and a lot of waiting in line) will give you a lot more to savor.

A leisurely stroll through Parc Güell, another Gaudí masterpiece

Barcelona

Sense a trend? Barcelona’s face has been painted by Gaudí, and his impressions are all over this beautiful (and vast) park. There are a number of entryways, and none of them charge admission. The “Zona Monument” is the primary entrance, and you’ll know you’re there if you spot two tall, white-tiled towers surrounded by mobs of people and even more colored tiles. There’s a “lucky lizard” in the center of the monument that you’re supposed to kiss, but beware of the “live lizard” standing at the gate. He’ll happily pose for a photograph, but only after you cough up a bit of change. So much for free admission! (P.S. – Skip the photograph — the interior of the park is more deserving of your attention).

Dipping and dodging down La Rambla

Barcelona

Common sense (and we here at Gadling) will tell you to avoid La Rambla at night. We’ve had first-hand experience with a pal being mugged there. But despite its well-earned stereotype, it’s an interesting place to scope out during the day. Loads of street vendors are out in force with great deals, and there are mimes galore freezing for your cash. Just keep a close eye on your pockets, and enjoy the zaniness that can only be found on this street.

Museum merry-go-round

Barcelona

One of Barcelona’s strong points is its wealth of museums. It’s really hard to go wrong, but we’d recommend you either love design or have an open mind about learning more on the subject. La Pedrera (by Antoni Gaudí), Museu Futbol Club Barcelona (for soccer fans), Museum d’ Història de Catalunya (self-explanatory), Maritime Museum, the Catalan Museum of Archaeology and the Museo Picasso de Barcelona are all worth a visit if you’re into those types of things, but they’re obviously more attractive in the winter when you can’t just pop on your swim suit and head to our final recommendation.

Playa Barceloneta: a beach, in the city!

Barcelona

It’s true! Barcelona, unlike many metropolises, has a beach. And not a “nearby beach,” but a beach that’s firmly within the city and is just a quick walk from the center of town (or easily accessible via metro / taxi). Playa Barceloneta is hailed as one of the world’s best urban beaches, and we aren’t arguing. There’s a massive strip of sand to enjoy (for a city, mind you), and the Mediterranean Sea is lovely to jump in during the summer. If you arrive in the off-season, the sand still slips between your toes just as easily, but you’ll need a serious wetsuit (or skin made from steel) to handle the chilly waters.

Have any Barcelona tips of your own? Share them in the comments section below!

Photo of the Day (12.18.2010)

Photo of the Day

A refreshing detail of Gaudi’s Casa Batllo in Barcelona, Spain. The bright colors, varying shapes, and whimsical lines of this roof line showcase Gaudi’s style without incorporating the entire work. I appreciate that a grand building’s overall feel can be shown in just a tiny detail. And it makes me feel cheerful just to look at it. Thanks to Flickr user Gus NYC for sharing it with Gadling’s readers.

Have any cheerful photos from your travels? Upload them to Gadling’s Flickr pool, and we just might choose one for our Photo of the Day feature.

Photo of the Day (10.11.09)

Truly great architecture has its own personality. The best buildings are not merely structures with walls, doors and windows. They tell you something about how they were made and the character of the places they were built. When I saw Flickr user scottmschutlz’s playful photo, I immediately knew it was taken at Gaudi’s Casa Milà in Barcelona. The fluid curves of the cement and quirky human-like face of this sculpture tip their hat to the whimsical, artistic traditions of this favorite Spanish city.

Want your pics considered for Gadling’s Photo of the Day? Submit your best ones here.