A Photo Tour Of Cape Town’s Colorful Bo-Kaap

Cape Town might be the world’s most visually striking city, between its dramatic coastal setting perched precariously against the looming Table Mountain and the town’s riotous collision of Europe and Africa, and from textiles to colonial Dutch architecture. Perhaps no Cape Town neighborhood better represents the sensory feast that is Cape Town than the Bo-Kaap, a wildly colorful enclave of brightly painted houses long home to the city’s unique population of Cape Malay residents.

Bo-Kaap got its start in the late 16th century, as Cape Town rose to prominence as a key stopover for merchant ships traveling between Europe and Asia. The largely Dutch traders who controlled Cape Town introduced Indonesian slaves (now known as Cape Malays) to the city, who then brought along their Islamic culture and cuisine. Bo-Kaap became home to the city’s Cape Malay community, weaving its way through a patchwork of brightly painted houses, historic mosques, spice shops and cobblestone streets.

Though the Bo-Kaap is quickly gentrifying, the neighborhood remains a fascinating sensory feast for an afternoon stroll. Turquoise and bright green houses compete for your eye’s attention with nearby Table Mountain, as a thick blanket of clouds gently rolls across its summit. Nearby a group of worshippers kneels outside one of Bo-Kaap’s mosques, their chanting wafting its way to your ears. On the next corner, a market stocks halal meats and fresh-made Koeksisters, a sweet South African donut.

Begin your own exploration of the Bo-Kaap signs and sights of the neighborhood in the Gadling gallery below!

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Word for the Travel Wise (12/21/06)

South AfricaIt has been yet another long and grueling day of driving. If you’ll excuse me I’ll keep from my pre-word babble and just give it straight to you.

Today’s word is an Afrikaans word used in South Africa:

baai – goodbye

For learning Afrikaans online check out this Afrikaans.us site and Ominglot guide with additional links. Aviva has a nice list of words with their translations you may hear most commonly during your visit in the country. Parties with some knowledge of the language may wish to do some reading over at this blog all in Afrikaans. I haven’t a clue what the content is about, but it could come in handy. Note that the name Afrikaans is simply the Dutch word for African where Afrikaans is the African form of the Dutch Language.

Past Afrikaans words: bly stil , plakkies, woestyn, dof, dagga

Word for the Travel Wise (10/07/06)

South Africa FlagVacationing in foreign places can be the most exhilarating high times experienced by all men and women. From the flight over to adjusting to culture shock, it’s quite easy to get wrapped up in the good, the bad and the ugly of any place. However, if while in South Africa you hear today’s word being offered to you, make sure you don’t mistake it for a dinner dish. Unless, maybe – you like that sort of thing.

Today’s word is an Afrikaans word used in South Africa:

dagga – marijuana

For learning Afrikaans online check out this Afrikaans.us site and Ominglot guide with additional links. Aviva has a nice list of words with their translations you may hear most commonly during your visit in the country. Parties with some knowledge of the language may wish to do some reading over at this blog all in Afrikaans. I haven’t a clue what the content is about, but it could come in handy. Note that the name Afrikaans is simply the Dutch word for African where Afrikaans is the African form of the Dutch Language.

Past Afrikaans words: bly stil , plakkies, woestyn, dof

Word for the Travel Wise (07/29/06)

South Africa flagA long time ago I said I wouldn’t post any naughty or disrespectful words in the languages posted mainly because you’re not likely to make friends using them and I’m all about collecting friends over enemies in foreign lands. However, this thought process of mine is not always one of another human being and therefore it is not a two way street. In the event I’m heading down a narrow-minded one way street in Johannesburg or just happen to over hear the use of certain negative words I’d still like to know their meaning. That being said here’s something you probably don’t want to be called while journeying South Africa…

Today’s word is an Afrikaans word used in South Africa:

dof – a derogatory term that describes someone who is a little dim-witted

For learning Afrikaans online check out this Afrikaans.us site and Ominglot guide with additional links. Aviva has a nice list of words with their translations you may hear most commonly during your visit in the country. Parties with some knowledge of the language may wish to do some reading over at this blog all in Afrikaans. I haven’t a clue what the content is about, but it could come in handy. Note that the name Afrikaans is simply the Dutch word for African where Afrikaans is the African form of the Dutch Language.

Past Afrikaans words: bly stil , plakkies, woestyn