It’s Still Snowing Somewhere In Oregon

crater lake oregonWhen you think of wintery weather, Oregon might not be the first state that comes to mind. It certainly wasn’t for me until I visited snowed-under Crater Lake National Park and other snowy, high altitude spots in the Beaver State last week. It was 76 degrees and sunny on the day we left Klamath Falls, Oregon, for the park, which is only 70 miles to the north, and even though I’d been told that Rim Drive, the scenic route around the park, was closed due to snow, I didn’t quite believe it.

To me, it was like being in South Beach on a toasty, warm day and hearing that there was snow in West Palm Beach. But Crater Lake is about 2,000 feet higher than Klamath Falls and sure enough, the place was still buried in snow.

“All the hiking trails are covered in deep snow,” said the park ranger who took our $10 entry fee. “But we rent snow shoes if you’re interested.”
We drove on towards the visitor’s center and were astonished to see huge snowdrifts on both sides of the neatly paved road. Over at the lake’s Discovery Point lookout, it was 41 degrees according to our rental car’s temperature gauge, but when I stepped out of the car, I was almost knocked down by a ferocious wind that made it feel as though it was in the teens. I had brought a hat and gloves but there were a few other hapless tourists there in shorts and T-shirts grimacing in pain.

crater lake oregon

Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States at more than 1,900 feet (seventh deepest in the world) and the water is remarkably clean. I have never seen a deeper shade of blue in my life and the contrast of the snow against the steep cliffs along the lake makes for an unforgettable view. According to the Moon Guide to Oregon, Kodak used to send apologies along with photos they processed of the lake because their technicians couldn’t believe that the water at Crater Lake was that blue. It is.

crater lake oregon

Rim Drive was indeed closed after Discovery Point to traffic but that made it pleasant to walk on and although we couldn’t really take advantage of the park’s 90 miles of hiking trails with two kids and no snow shoes, it was delightful to have a national park practically all to ourselves, even if it was bitterly cold and windy.

After leaving Crater Lake, we spent four days in Bend, one of America’s most beautifully situated cities with snowcapped mountains in almost every direction, and had more wintery surprises in store for us. McKenzie Pass, reputed to be one of the most scenic drives in the Cascade Range, was closed due to snow, as was most of the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway, despite the fact that it was nearly 80 degrees in nearby Bend.

mt bachelor oregon

But only 20 minutes outside Bend, the Mt. Bachelor ski resort was not only open but also busy with skiers. The place remains open through Memorial Day and at this time of year visitors to Bend can ski in the morning and play tennis or golf in the afternoon. For a guy who lives in the flat, boring Midwest, the quick and dramatic changes in altitude and weather are reason enough to get on a plane and head to Oregon.

10 Title-Holding National Parks In The United States

park National parks hold some of the most beautiful and diverse landscapes in the country, and sometimes even the world. Not only do these destinations make for great hiking, biking and adventure sports, but they also allow you to view one-of-a-kind facets you can’t find anywhere else on the planet.

While Black Canyon of the Gunnison holds the title of being the country’s newest national park, Yellowstone was the world’s first, being established in 1872. Additionally, Sequoia National Park features the world’s largest tree; Great Sand Dunes National Park holds the highest sand dunes in North America; and Death Valley is said to be the hottest, lowest and driest place in the United States.

For a more visual idea of these title-holding national parks, check out the gallery below.

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[Image above via Jessie on a Journey; Gallery images via Big Stock]

National parks are free again next weekend!

Next weekend, August 14-15, is the third, and final, fee free weekend in America’s national parks for 2010. For those two days, more than 100 of the parks will open their gates to the public at no cost, giving visitors a chance to experience “America’s best idea” for themselves.

The complete list of parks that will be waiving their entry fees can be found by clicking here. That list includes such spectacular icons as Yosemite, Yellowstone, and Acadia, as well as lesser known, but no less amazing, parks like Big Bend, the Dry Tortugas, and Crater Lake. All told, more than 40 states are represented on the list, which means there is a national park or monument that will be free to visit next weekend near just about everyone in the U.S.

The fee free weekends have been very popular that past few years, and crowds in the parks will no doubt be high. But if you can’t make it out to your favorite national park on the 14th or 15th, never fear, as there are still two more fee free days to come in 2010. On Saturday, Sept. 25th, the parks will be free in celebration of Public Lands Day and then once again on Thursday, Nov. 11th, in honor of Veteran’s Day.

With summer quickly coming to a close, take advantage of this last fee free weekend of the year for some outdoor fun and adventure.

[Photo credit: National Park Service]

20 great bike rides

For many travelers, the default mode of transport is a plane or a car, but they’re certainly not the only options. Have you ever considered adding a bicycle ride to your next trip? Riding a bike has a number of advantages over other forms of transportation. You’ll move slower, no doubt, but with that slowness comes an increased awareness of your surroundings, a chance to get some fresh air and exercise and the sense of accomplishment that comes with a great ride. Whether you’re looking to ride across the USA or simply take a leisurely pedal around a nearby town, Gadling has compiled the following list of 20 great bike rides. Take a look below!

Mackinac Island, Michigan
Straddling the divide between Lake Huron and Michigan, Mackinac Island transports bikers to the simpler days where horse drawn carriages and bicycles were the main modes of transportation. Not having to worry about sharing the road with motorized vehicles, with the exception of emergency and service vehicles, this island is a cyclist’s haven. With 3 bike rental outfits to choose from, anyone can enjoy this National Historic Landmark filled with Victorian charm on 2 wheels and after a visit here, you will not want to return to the hustle and bustle of the 21st Century.

Newport, Rhode Island
It is understandable that images of the renowned Newport Mansions are the first to come to mind when you hear “Newport, Rhode Island.” Admittedly grand on the inside, riding by these mansions from the outside and through the surrounding parts of town are just as breathtaking. Take the path passing by the Newport Harbor, Brenton Cove, Ocean Ave, and of course Bellevue Ave where you get a feast for the eyes with the famed Marble House, The Elms, and Chateau sur Mer, among other grand homes and before long, you can understand why the rich chose this location as their summer playground.

Monterey Bay, California
California’s Monterey Bay is filled with many options for a scenic bike ride. The famous 17 mile drive meanders through Pebble Beach but those who prefer skipping the entrance fee can be rewarded with an equally scenic ride on what some dubbed the “Poor Man’s 17 Mile Drive”. Drive down to the Asilomar State Beach where parking can usually be found and ride along the coastline through the town of Pacific Groves where in the spring you may come upon the harbor seal pups lounging on the sand and frolicking in the ocean. Do not forget to bring binoculars for those otter sightings as you bike through Monterey and Cannery Row.

Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii
When one thinks of Maui, biking is probably not on the top of the list. However, they would be missing one of the best bird’s eye view experience. Although Haleakala National Park eliminated commercial downhill bike tour operations a few years back, bikes are still allowed. Those wishing to bike downhill from the summit can rent bikes from Haleakala Bike and experience unparalleled views of the island itself as they bike down. Two tips for riders: Have someone drop you off at the summit so you will not have to ride back up to pickup your car and wear layers that you can peel off as you descend from 40 degree temps at the top to 80s at the bottom.

Napa Valley Silverado Trail, California

Although not along a coast or body of water, the Napa Valley Wine Country is a beautiful place for a scenic bike ride. Start in picturesque Yountville and take the less crowded Silverado Trail that parallels CSR 29. You will find yourself surrounded by the yellow mustard fields in the spring and vineyards that stretch for miles that for a moment, you might think you were in Tuscany. You can not go wrong with a bike ride here any time of year. After an invigorating ride, you can enjoy a leisurely picnic and a wine tasting or two at a choice of wineries, including Duckhorn and Rutherford Hill.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

South of the famous Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming’s other gem, Grand Teton NP offers hundreds of miles of hiking trails but biking paths are harder to find. Since accessibility is limited in areas, joining their “Scenic Guided Bike Ride” would be the best and safest option. The bike tour will have you riding through open prairies, under the peaks of the Teton Mountain Range, and through sagebrush flats where you may spot where the buffalos roam.

Sausalito/San Francisco, California
Marin County’s Sausalito is reminiscent of a coastal Mediterranean town with its colorful houses clinging to the hillsides and houseboats along the north end of town. Riding through downtown will offer you views of the SF skyline and the bridge in the distance and those who are on a mission to chase that mirage can ride across the Golden Gate Bridge and back or through San Francisco and return by ferry.

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts
New England’s Martha’s Vineyard south of Cape Cod is a popular spot for celebrities but knows how to retain its low key atmosphere. With over 44 miles of bike trails and roads available, there are options for beginners and advanced riders alike. The “down-Island” route is mainly flat, great for beginners and families while the “up-Island” route is for more experienced riders. Either way, you will get to experience the versatility of this place with its changing landscapes from the gorgeous waters and beaches to the meadows to the red Aquinnah Cliffs. Before long it will seem like everything is a vista point.

Lake Tahoe, California
Tahoe, known for its ski slopes and casinos may find that it may still be a hidden gem for mountain biking. Northstar Ski Resort opens up its lift access for downhill mountain biking adventures in the summer. Just purchase a lift pass and you can take the lift up and bike down. For those less adventurous, get a “pedaling only pass” to access the park and cross country ride for free from a choice of beginner to advance trails all with beautiful views of the surrounding mountains and trees.

Coronado, California
San Diego County’s picturesque coastal community offers a village atmosphere with a downtown filled with shops, restaurant, and theaters. With many bike friendly areas to choose from, you are treated to ocean views, architecture, and history including the home of Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum. He was so in love with Coronado, many erroneously thought his vision for the Emerald City must have stemmed from the Hotel del Coronado. Erroneous or not, anyone can see how a place like Coronado can be so inspirational.

— The above was written by Joyce Zee, Seed contributor.



Rock Creek Park Trails, Washington DC (5-50 miles)
Suggested starts: N. Pitt St and Second St. in Alexandria or Dupont Circle in DC

There are so many great bike paths in the DC area, but this is one of my favorite rides, from Alexandria’s Old Town with its many federalist buildings, along the Potomac River, past Reagan National Airport and Arlington Cemetery, across the river at Memorial Bridge to the Lincoln Memorial, and then into Rock Creek Park. There are a few tricky transitions, particularly around the Lincoln Memorial, and the path is very popular on weekends. Parts of the Rock Creek Park roads are bikes-only on weekends. You can take your bike on Metro for the return trip too.

Mississippi River trail to Chain of Rocks Bridge, St. Louis Missouri (20 miles)
Suggested start: Commercial St. and Carr St., downtown St. Louis

St. Louis is my hometown now and this is a frequent route because it is relatively flat and has some great views both of the River and the industrial side of the city. You can see the Arch at many points along the river, as well as pass multiple levees and locks. It ends at a bridge that is closed to car traffic and figured prominently in the movie “Escape from New York”. There are links to other trails that cross the river and you can return on the Illinois side, for some variety. Few services along the way, bring lots of water.

Brooklyn Bridge, New York City (5 miles)
Suggested start: Park Row and Centre Streets, New York City, across from City Hall

This is the one iconic ride in Manhattan that anyone can do, and while packed on the weekends (and you share the path with pedestrians), during the week it can be very enjoyable. It is a bit of a climb too. Finding the path on the Brooklyn side can be a challenge, and if you want more than the bridge ride you can travel across Chambers Street in Manhattan and connect with the path along the Hudson River along the West Side Highway.

Crater Lake Rim Road, Oregon (33 miles)
Suggested start: Rim Village parking lot

This road circles Crater Lake, a volcanic caldera that contains almost pure water of the most amazing color blue. The road is only open during July and August since at more than 7,000 feet it is snowed in the rest of the time. There is light auto traffic but the views are unparalleled of the lake and the surrounding mountains. If the 33-mile ride isn’t sufficient, you can hike down to the lake in one spot too. Only attempt this if you are in excellent shape and have ridden at altitude before.

St. Michaels to Easton, Maryland (36 miles)
Suggested Start: Courthouse on Washington St. in St. Michaels

This part of Maryland is completely flat and very picturesque. You will be near water and boats and biking on very rural (meaning little traffic but plenty of ruts) roads. There is even a short ferry to take across the Tred Avon River that runs frequently. There are numerous historic buildings that date from colonial times and dozens of B&Bs and restaurants to take advantage of when you are done biking. Some of the roads are in poor condition so better to use a heavier mountain or hybrid bike for this trip.

Shelter Island, New York (10-50 miles)
Suggested start: Greenport, NY ferry terminal/Long Island Railroad train station

Shelter Island is a small island that is nestled between the two forks of Long Island, and is a biking paradise. The roads are well maintained, there is hardly any traffic, and while it has hills, you are never far from water and great views of the Peconic Bay . You can do many trips in the area, including a circle one that takes in both ferries, but starting in Greenport is best for the variety of services, restaurants, and places to stay nearby. Plus, you can take your bike on the Long Island Rail Road to there too.

Saltspring Island, British Columbia, Canada (~30 miles)
Suggested start: Sydney, BC ferry terminal

This trip will take some planning but is worth it because you have virtually no traffic once the cars leave the ferry, have lots of interesting places to visit, and you’ll be biking through some of the most spectacular scenery in North America. There are dozens of small islands that are perfect for biking and BC Ferries and the ferry from Sydney is a good place to start. Saltspring Island is one of the bigger islands in between Vancouver Island and the mainland, and you can take other ferries to other islands as well as Vancouver Island to continue your exploration.

Santa Monica to Manhattan Beach, California (10-40 miles)

Suggested start: Dockweiler Beach State Park

The best beach bike path is very crowded in summer, but great the rest of the year. You visit the Venice Boardwalk, go around the Marina Del Rey’s many boat docks, underneath the flight path of LAX airport, and past many surfers to end up in trendy Manhattan Beach. Parking is difficult, and finding your way around the Marina can be a challenge.

Death Valley, California (10-100 miles)
Suggested start: Furnace Creek Visitor Center

There are no water views on this ride but you are traveling between two lovely mountain ranges with hardly any traffic. Skip the summer months, but this ride is great the rest of the year when temperatures are more moderate. You can go up to a century to Jubilee Pass (1300 foot) or more moderate distances. The road is a bit rough in spots and no shoulders.

Paradise, Mt. Rainer, Washington (40 miles)
Suggested Start: Nisqually Entrance of the park

This is another trip for very experienced cyclists. You are riding on narrow mountain roads with no shoulders and at altitude, and this route will rise more than 3,000 feet in the 20 miles it takes you to get to Paradise. The good news is that the return trip will take no time at all and it is a breeze. The best time to do this ride is in late August or September. Weekends can be crowded with cars. The views of the mountains are unparalleled.

— The above was written by David Strom, Seed contributor.

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18 more great spots for hikers

Most hikers agree: the best way to really learn about a place is to experience it by walking or climbing. It inspired us here at Gadling to take a look in February at the world’s best hikes. There were so many great spots, in fact, we decided to follow it up today with 18 more. This collection of treasured, world-class hikes offers a variety of unforgettable experiences, and promises surprising personal growth with each one. Some have level terrain, while others climb soaring elevations. For the beginner and experienced hiker, there’s something for everyone in each location. Take a look at our picks below.

Pembrokeshire Coast, Wales
The most westerly spot in Wales, this mostly level, cliffside Pembrokeshire Coast trail provides contrasting colors – and inspiration. Along this hike you teeter precariously next to aggressive waves slamming into somber, 50 foot black slate cliffs. But the sun and magical clouds impishly create frequent rainbows that playfully coax you away from the dark edge and into meadows. Take the path that dips down into Abereiddy Bay, where you confront shiny black shale and sand. Stay in St. David’s, and see the 7th Century stone cathedral.

Zion, Utah, USA
Zion’s wide range of hikes provides level, valley floor walks, or climbs amidst soaring, majestic rock formations. The Emerald Pools hike is an ideal, beginner’s one-mile walk. An intermediate path to Scout’s Lookout provides a gradual cliff face climb using switchbacks. At Scout’s lookout, a hiker’s decision awaits…There is a deceptively easy, one-mile path which continues up to Angel’s Landing. While other hikes are more physically strenuous, this one can stretch the psyche and nerve of even the most experienced hiker. Precarious, thousand foot drops appear within inches of your feet. The only way to get to (and from) Angel’s Landing, is by holding onto chains – bolted into the rock. Not for the faint-hearted, Angel’s Landing is perhaps the most popular destination hike in the park.


Swanage, Dorset, England
An easy weekend break from London via train, Swanage lies nestled into England’s southeast tip. Here, an established, old-resort charm defines this historic town; however, hikers are treated to an otherwise hidden assortment of eclectic sites that give multiple complexities to the town’s personality. Stay in a B&B, and take the Durlston Castle path past a fascinating, out-of-place Victorian folly. Nearby, is the stalwart Anvil Point lighthouse. The scenic path turns inland, and seemingly out of nowhere, you find yourself seeking refuge at a place that makes a lot of sense – a huge pub. Complete with live music, here you’ll find the best pint you ever tasted. The public bus back to town comes by every hour or two.

Sossusvlei, Namibia
A four hour drive from Windhoek, Sossusvlei is the place on earth that seems most like another planet. Home to some of the world’s tallest sand dunes, these dramatic red shapes offer visitors unique visual inspiration set against the blazing sky. Climbing the steep dunes is a challenge for both kids and experienced hikers. Soaring sand ridges appear fragile, but sand grains quickly collect and form angles – banishing your footprints into obscurity. It’s tempting to get lost in all the redness – sit midway up a dune on its ridge, push it down and watch it form over you; you become part of this land. Constant wind and sun encourage dehydration, so your guide should bring plenty of water.

Black Forest, Germany
A well-traveled path meanders through this unforgettable forest that feels like home. Its magical embrace encourages the hiker in a patriarchal, protective way – enticing and beckoning you into the extended forest family. Stay at a B&B in Buhl (we like the Neusatz Pension Linz). After breakfast, head out through vineyards into the Schwarzvald toward the 13th century Windeck Castle. It’s hard to leave the forest’s embrace when you finally reach the castle clearing…do take time to have lunch at the castle and tour the ruins. Just don’t linger too long. The forest’s character changes on the way back. The woods’ earlier warmth evolves into a spooky, shadowy world that questions a hiker’s resolve. After all, this is where the Grimm’s Fairy Tales took place…

Antrim Coast, North Ireland
Across the North Channel from Scotland, Giant’s Causeway provides a shoreline hike amidst a vast collection of geometric, stone columns with an almost spiritual quality. A magnificent study in uniform, artistic rock formations, this “columnar jointing” illustrates how the earth’s magma designs its own ethereal architecture. These structures influence a hiker toward a heavenly, Gothic viewpoint. Stay at Smuggler’s Inn – an easy, 45 minute car ride from Belfast. If it’s summer and not windy, hike across the breath-taking Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge.

Captiva Island, Florida
Captiva Island is the prettiest beach hike we have ever found. Take a good hat, and before the sun gets intense, ride the tram from the Village to Captiva’s northernmost point. Head south along this other-world, barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico. You’ll share this pristine shoreline with some of the world’s most interesting birds, dolphins and seashells. As you inhale this special sea air, somehow you understand why yoga becomes so important. Continue to the “Mucky Duck” along the beach for a traditional fish and chips lunch, then take the loop back through the island cottages.

— The above was written by Kris Myers, Seed contributor.



Continental Divide Trail, Colorado
Running over 3100 miles, the Continental Divide offers one of the most breathtaking hikes one will ever take in their life, here in the United States. When hiking this trail one will get the feeling of a life journey, see the epiphany in the hike itself, the divide, between the mountains and two states, like ones journey through life. With the average hike taking roughly six months to complete the entire trail this is a life feat, not a day in the park. This is on the list of the top ten hikes for those who are on a life journey, ready to conquer the world, define who they are, and take on the world.

Rock Bridge State Park, Columbia MO

Rock Bridge was chosen out of pure experience, and good old memories. This state park is located in the heart of Columbia, Missouri and has been deemed a state park, there for saving it from becoming victim to economic growth and real estate expansion. The park sits on what is called Devils Ice box, which a famous cave, that all of the local schools venture out during science class for field trips, teaching students about the caves and for short expeditions through the park and cave.

Every year, the local high school will bring their students out for a day of orientation. Where they will be given a map, a compass, and a bottle of water, leaving them to go from check point to check point. This is where my hiking experience with the state park comes from, and has offered many memories, and education experiences. This is a park for the whole family, from bat caves to water springs, to miles of nature trails.

Horseshoe Bend, Spirit Lake, Iowa
When you are up north, roughly 12- 15 miles from the NW Iowa/Minnesota border, visit the Iowa Great Lakes and go hiking through Horseshoe Bend. How often can you go hiking through the woods, and come out and see the beach and freshwater lakes? This is a very diverse area and a lot of fun to visit, great for hiking and camping, fishing and swimming, great for a family vacation.

Superior Hiking Trail, Duluth, Minnesota
The Superior Hiking Trail is accessible at many points along the way — and getting on this relatively young trail (conceived in the mid-1980s) is definitely worth it. The 210-mile path extends through wilderness north of Duluth, Minnesota, to the Canadian border; a 40-mile extension is in the works. With knockout views of Lake Superior, the path draws 50,000 people a year, some of whom glimpse bear and moose. (Allow three weeks for the whole trail.

James Dilley Preserve, Laguna Beach, California

For a nice early morning or afternoon hike, you can venture out for a nice “circle track” hike through James Dilley Preserve, located on roughly 3 miles through Laguna beach trail and Barbara’s lake, with an elevation of around 300 + feet. This is a great hike for those looking for a naturalistic and challenging hike to add to your morning or afternoon exercise routine. This trail is going to be your one opportunity to see one of two natural Laguna Beach lakes. Canyon Trial is part of this loop hike, and this is a great workout routine addition.

Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina
Grandfather Mountain is a privately owned mountain that has been protected by the owners, and yet shared at the same time. It is a family affair for sure. With several different things to do, and one of them happens to be hiking, on many of their trails, throughout the park, and the Mountain. Some of the mountains offer back trails, which offer cool, Spring like temperatures, offering wonderful and refreshing hiking weather. The mountain offers the opportunity to go across a mile long swinging bridge, see a 360 scenic view of the area, and is a natural habitat for several different endangered species giving you the unique opportunity to see them in their own element and homes.

Mount Scott, Oregon
A five-mile round trip on Mount Scott, the highest peak in Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park, offers breathtaking views of the country’s deepest lake, formed by volcanic eruption 7,000 years ago. Along the way, you’ll step past 400-year-old whitebark pines, hardy high-elevation survivors. The view of Crater Lake is so stunning it will appear on Oregon’s commemorative quarter, starting in June. This hike isn’t for the fainthearted; you’ll gain 1,500 feet in 2.5 miles of climbing. But the 360-degree views of the lake, the Klamath Basin, and California’s distant Mount Shasta make it a great destination.

The Kerry Way Walking Trail, Ireland

The Kerry Way is a walking holiday which meanders through beautiful Ireland’s largest peninsula, Iveragh and has been called Ireland’s finest walking route. Walking or hiking through the Kerry Way’s 135 mile waymarked trail is primarily inland taking you through river valleys, gouged out by glaciers of the last ice age but with sections giving superb coastal views. You follow a coastline full of inlets and bays, beautiful sandy beaches and unforgiving cliffs.

You will enjoy the hospitality and warmth of the towns and villages of South Kerry which developed here throughout the ages. Glenbeigh – Cahirciveen – Waterville – Caherdaniel, Derrynane – Sneem – Kenmare and Killarney. You walk past the rich archaeological remains which tell the story of the people who lived in the Kingdom of Kerry down through the years and you will marvel at the flora and fauna which changes around each turn in the trail.

North Country National Scenic Trail
The North Country National Scenic Trail links scenic, natural, historic, and cultural areas in seven northern states(New York, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, North Dakota). The approximately four thousand mile long trail includes a variety of hikes from easy walking to challenging treks. When completed, through the efforts of many people, the trail will become the longest continuous hiking trail in the United States. From the Missouri River in North Dakota to the shores of Lake Champlain in New York, the trail allows hikers to experience a variety of features, from clear-flowing streams, to thick Northern woods, from vast prairies to clean lakes.

Topanga State Park Trek, Los Angeles, CA

Topanga State Park begins in Pacific Palisades at the end of Los Liones Drive, just north of Sunset Boulevard. Leave the car in the parking lot at the end of the street. From there, follow the trail up to East Topanga Fire Road and follow that to the turnoff for the Parker Mesa Overlook.Switchbacks and steep hill climbs characterize the first two miles of this hike. With an elevation gain of about 1,300 feet, the hike is definitely a tougher climb. But you’ll get rewarded as you gaze out from your vantage point atop the bluff. Enjoy a picnic lunch or relax on a bench while taking in the overlook.

— The above was written by iCatching Content, Seed contributor.

Need more inspiration to get outside? Keep reading!