Warsaw, Poland: an up-and-coming European museum destination

European museum destination
As an EU member with a good exchange rate and low prices, Poland is becoming a popular tourist destination in Eastern Europe. Most of the love goes to Krakow, with its original architecture and “new Prague” charm, but capital city Warsaw has plenty to offer as a European museum destination. While much of the old town was leveled in World War II, the restorations have been painstakingly done and the tumultuous history makes for a great basis for museum exhibitions.

Like Berlin, Warsaw has embraced its past and given the visitor plenty to learn from and new investments mean state-of-the-art attractions and exhibitions.

Given all of the places to see, Warsaw could easily fill a week (or two) on a Europe trip. Here’s a look at some of Warsaw’s best museums.
Only-in-Warsaw

Warsaw (Up)Rising Museum – Warsaw’s proudest museum is a hi-tech interactive experience detailing the events of the two-month rebellion of the Polish people against the German forces as well as what preceded and followed. It borders on being overly comprehensive, the hundreds of artifacts can overwhelm, as can the crowds who line up daily. Be sure to follow museum signs as you walk through, as the chronological exhibit doesn’t necessarily follow the logical path.

Gestapo Headquarters and Pawiak Prison – Two of the city’s most unassuming buildings were once the most feared. Not as flashy as the Rising Museum but equally effective, the former Gestapo HQ contains a few stark cells that once held prisoners to be interrogated and often tortured before being taken to the prison, along with very professionally-done interactive displays telling the experiences of the poor souls held there. Most of the prison in the former Jewish ghetto has been destroyed, but dozens of artifacts and exhibits explain the prisoners’ conditions and attempt to describe the horrors that happened there.


Fryderyk Chopin Museum – Another hi-tech, multimedia extravaganza, this brand new space dedicated to Poland’s most famous composer goes beyond the usual exhibition with a fully customizable experience. Sample sounds from a rare score, read letters to the important women in Chopin’s life, and see a recreation of his Paris drawing room.

Palace of Culture and Science – Not so much a museum as a gift Warsaw can’t hide away, the tallest building in Poland was a gift from Joseph Stalin and it’s hard to go anywhere in the city without seeing the Soviet beast. Though the building is enormous, not much of it is open to the public. It’s worth a trip to the terrace for panoramic city views (see above photo) or spend an afternoon making sense of the bizarrely curated Museum of Technology.

Want more history? There are also museums dedicated to the Polish People’s Movement and Polish Independence, plus the many churches and monuments of the restored Old City and Krakowskie Przedmiescie street. Warsaw’s Jewish culture is also well-documented at the new Jewish Museum and Wola district historical museum.

Well-done in Warsaw


Center for Contemporary Art at Ujazdowski Castle – A few blocks away from the Gestapo Headquarters, the building has a history as a royal residence, medical hospital, and now modern art museum. Some of the most innovative artists in Poland and Europe are showcased here: November saw a show focused on Internet-shaped culture such as a scrolling display of Twitter results for the phrase “Best day ever.”


Warsaw Zoo – In addition to being a nicely-maintained habitat for animals, this zoo has a fascinating and heroic past. Diane Ackerman’s book The Zookeeper’s Wife tells the story of the zoo director who aided in war efforts and saved many Jewish Poles from the Nazis by hiding them in the animal cages.


Royal Castle and Wilanow Palace – Just outside the Old City, the Royal Castle was also rebuilt from scratch and houses a slew of antiques and artwork, as well as excellent temporary exhibitions such as Leonardo da Vinci’s “Lady with an Ermine” and other treasures from other museums. If you visit in good weather, it’s worth a day out of town to visit the grand Wilanow Palace and gardens, the Polish Versailles.

Not exhausted yet? Small museums also specialize in collections of cars, trains, military weaponry, horse-riding, caricatures, and Polish physicist Marie Curie. See the In Your Pocket Warsaw guide for more info.


80 gigapixel London panorama breaks city photo record

London Panorama

What you see above is the result of an 80 gigapixel panaormic photo of London. The photo was shot in the summer of 2010 from the top of the Centre Point building.

Using 7886 individual images, the creator turned them into a single image. If you look closely at the right image, you’ll barely make out the London Eye – the image on the left if what you see of the London Eye when you zoom all the way in. This shows just how much detail was captured in the picture.

Go ahead and head on over to the site and spend some time browsing your way through one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

Other panorama photos we’ve covered in the past include Prague (18 gigapixels), Paris (26 gigapixels), Dubai (45 gigapixels) and Budapest (70 gigapixels).

[Photo from 360Cities.net / Jeffrey Martin]

Browse 70 gigapixels of panoramic Budapest in the world’s largest photograph

Last year, we showed you an 18 gigapixel photo of Prague, followed by a 26 gigapixel photo of Paris, and a 45 gigapixel photo of Dubai. The world of gigapixel photography has a new winner – a whopping 70 gigapixel photo of Budapest. The photo is claimed to be the largest photo on earth, but of course, at this rate, the record will be broken by the end of summer.

Head on over to the photo site, and use the controls on the left to browse around and zoom in on any location. Under the photo are highlights of the city, which should save you the effort of trying to find things yourself. For the best effect, click the top button on the control bar to move the panorama to full screen mode.

(Thanks Nick!)

View the beauty of Paris in a 26 Gigapixel HD panorama

I’m in love with Paris – ever since my first visit, it has been my absolute favorite destination. Even after close to 60 visits, I never get bored of the atmosphere. Right now, I’m sitting behind my desk enjoying the city in all its splendor, thanks to a 26 Gigapixel panoramic photo.

The panorama was created by Martin Loyer and Arnaud Frich, and involved shooting 2346 individual photos, and combining them into a single image 354159×75570 pixels large. Their site lets you browse around the panorama and zoom in on any portion.

Helpful pointers describe some of the various landmarks, along with their history. On the right hand side, you’ll find a handy set of links to the most popular Parisian monuments.

And finally, in the top right hand corner is a small “HD” button – after installing a Microsoft plugin, you’ll be able to view the panorama in “real” HD quality.

The amount of detail is amazing – it obviously isn’t as nice as actually being there, but it sure is a fun way to spend my morning.

GigaPan Epic 100 panoramic photo maker gets the Engadget hands-on

Back in January, we wrote about an absolutely astounding photo of the Presidential Inauguration. The photo was stiched together from 100’s of individual photos, made with a GigaPan device which controls the camera movements.

Our buddies over at Engadget just took the GigaPan for a spin and made some of their own panoramic photos.

The results are surprisingly good. They had some minor gripes with its weight, but were generally impressed with the unit and its amazing photo stitching software.

So, head on over to Engadget
to check out the GigaPan Epic 100, and the results of their panoramic shooting spree using this $449 robot.