Photo Of The Day: New York, Via Hoboken

New York City skyline Hoboken
Jake Thiewes, AOL

Where did you go for your Labor Day weekend travels? I ended up in New York City, after a particularly early morning jaunt to Morristown, Union City and Hoboken in New Jersey — all in the name of an old BMW. Three of us crashed at my old college roommate’s place on Saturday night. Waking up to the sprawl of Hoboken and the Manhattan skyline, seen from his Union City apartment’s balcony, was a really neat view.

We’d love to feature your photos and videos on Gadling, so please add them to our Flickr Pool (with Creative Commons licensing!), tag @GadlingTravel on Instagram or email us at OfTheDay@gadling.com.

Photo Of The Day: A Gorgeous Moscow Metro Station

Mariusz Kluzniak, Flickr

One of the most beautiful subway systems in the world is the Moscow Metro. The system was originally built under direct orders from Stalin to create gorgeous stations that the people of Moscow would admire for its depictions of a “radiant future.” Mariusz Kluzniak took this fantastic panorama of the absolutely beautiful Novoslobodskaya Station. The station’s architect, Alexey Dushkin, spent well over a decade on the design, eventually commissioning designs for 32 stained glass panels from famed Russian artist Pavel Korin. The result is fantastic and unlike any other public transportation station in the world.

If you have a great photo, submit it to our Gadling Flickr Group and it could be chosen as one of our future Photos of the Day.

Browse 70 gigapixels of panoramic Budapest in the world’s largest photograph

Last year, we showed you an 18 gigapixel photo of Prague, followed by a 26 gigapixel photo of Paris, and a 45 gigapixel photo of Dubai. The world of gigapixel photography has a new winner – a whopping 70 gigapixel photo of Budapest. The photo is claimed to be the largest photo on earth, but of course, at this rate, the record will be broken by the end of summer.

Head on over to the photo site, and use the controls on the left to browse around and zoom in on any location. Under the photo are highlights of the city, which should save you the effort of trying to find things yourself. For the best effect, click the top button on the control bar to move the panorama to full screen mode.

(Thanks Nick!)

View the beauty of Paris in a 26 Gigapixel HD panorama

I’m in love with Paris – ever since my first visit, it has been my absolute favorite destination. Even after close to 60 visits, I never get bored of the atmosphere. Right now, I’m sitting behind my desk enjoying the city in all its splendor, thanks to a 26 Gigapixel panoramic photo.

The panorama was created by Martin Loyer and Arnaud Frich, and involved shooting 2346 individual photos, and combining them into a single image 354159×75570 pixels large. Their site lets you browse around the panorama and zoom in on any portion.

Helpful pointers describe some of the various landmarks, along with their history. On the right hand side, you’ll find a handy set of links to the most popular Parisian monuments.

And finally, in the top right hand corner is a small “HD” button – after installing a Microsoft plugin, you’ll be able to view the panorama in “real” HD quality.

The amount of detail is amazing – it obviously isn’t as nice as actually being there, but it sure is a fun way to spend my morning.

View the beauty of Prague — through the largest panorama photo in the world

What happens when you set up a digital camera on top of the Prague TV tower, and let it snap away for a couple of hours? Well, you end up with a 360 degree panoramic shot of the city, measuring 192,000 x 96,000 pixels, for a total of 18 gigapixels.

The image is currently the largest panoramic city shot in the world, and it is hosted by 360cities.net. You can rotate the image, and zoom in on any portion. You’ll be amazed just how far you can zoom in without losing photo quality.

If you want to know what/where you are looking at in the panorama, just click the “show map” tab on the left side. It’ll pull up a Google map of the area. The real fun part is wasting your day, trying to find weird and wacky stuff going on.